One Man's Gander is Another's Goose

Another storyboard artist story:

I learned very early in my career that whom one works with and how that person’s personal taste jives with yours is pretty essential to a harmonious and productive relationship on any given creative project. Butting heads can work, but only if there is serious mutual respect for each other’s abilities. In most cases, being in the same chapter of the stylistic book is usually enough for everything to be smooth. That said...

A long long time ago, when I was just starting out as a Storyboard Artist (less than a year into it and maybe having done only 10 or 11 partial storyboards) I was out of work and looking. I’d just finished working on The TICK season 3 and feeling pretty good about my abilities. The TICK people seemed to like what I was doing and I had gained some confidence from that experience: I realized that I knew what I was doing so long as I was working for people who liked the kind of storyboarding esthetic I leaned towards (I can do many different styles, but my personal taste still comes into play regardless of series style). By contrast, when I worked with someone whose sensibilities ran counter to mine, the storyboard experience was a disaster.

One quick example: After handing in a rough storyboard for approval, the Director said of it, “You are like the Orson Welles of animation”. He then proceeded to shred the storyboard into what no longer could be called my work and was 99% all his. I guess he didn’t think much of Orson Welles’ work. It’s a good thing Welles didn’t work in animation.

I won’t mention any names for the rest of this story as it doesn’t really matter towards the moral of the story.

I knew of someone in Toronto who had a storyboard contract with a big L.A. studio to provide said studio with storyboards that would be produced in Toronto. It was an action show with realistic (animation realistic) characters and I really wanted to do more of that kind of show after having done The TICK. I arranged to meet with the subcontractor to show him my work. I brought along my best TICK storyboard which was the first act of The Tick VS. Prehistory. After looking over the board I was politely told that I wasn’t right for the series. I was pretty bummed about that. After all, The TICK people seemed to really like my work. Needless to say that my fragile newbie storyboard artist’s ego took a big hit that afternoon. Luckily for me, I managed to pick something else up, that day, so I wasn’t out of work, I just wasn’t working on the series I wanted to take part in and it was because I wasn’t good enough. Wah.


My section starts after the opening at 00:30 and ends at 07:32. The sound is off in the video and I can’t take credit for any timing or animation issues, but I can take credit for the highs and lows of the storyboard. I don’t detect any changes from what I did.

About a week later, I got a call from a studio in L.A. saying something like, “Hi, I’m Ms. L.A. Animation from Big L.A. Studio. Producer from Sunbow said you are good and reliable. I was wondering if you were free to work on Action Show for us?” It was the same series I was trying to work on for the subcontractor in Toronto. Only now it was the original studio offering me the job. No meetings, no samples, no fuss and no muss. Of course I agreed to work on the series. I was only supposed to do one episode to help them out of a jam, but the L.A. people were very happy with my work and they asked me to help them with one more before the season finished.

Needless to say, I was extremely happy about this turn of events and fortune and I learned another important lesson: although one must always listen and process the feedback one gets, there are times when it isn’t “you”, it’s “them” and that’s fine because that’s just the way subjective art is. Some people will think you are amazing and some will think you stink. It’s up to oneself to decide if the feedback you get is valid. Opinion factors in heavily when it comes to art and one man’s Orson Welles is another’s “Orson Welles”. I wasn’t good enough for the subcontractor studio, but just wonderful for the studio hiring the subcontractor to do the very job I was rejected for. Go know.

The upside to my ego being crushed for a week was that the L.A. studio payed more than the Toronto studio was going to. So... I learned something important, got to work on the series after all, and I got paid better than I would have had I got the job from the subcontractor in the first place. Not a bad deal at all. Just goes to show that nothing is good or bad: it’s were the good or bad leads you.

My wisdom is endless.

-Steve

HIM
The new page (pg 35) has been posted over at HIMcomic. Click on the cover insisting preview of this week’s action to get more comics! AA-AA-AA!
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